SENIOR CARE ALISO VIEJO CA, ALISO VIEJO SENIOR CARE, SENIOR CARE IN ALISO VIEJO, ORANGE COUNTY, CA, HOSPICE ALISO VIEJO, HOMECARE ALISO VIEJO, RESPITE ALISO VIEJO, ASSISTED LIVING ALISO VIEJO, ELDER CARE ALISO VIEJO, NURSING HOME ALISO VIEJO, Aliso Viejo, Orange County, California, 92653, 92656, 92698

CAREGIVER AGENCIES ORANGE COUNTY, HOME CARE, HOSPICE, RESPITE
CAREGIVER, HOME CARE, SENIOR LIVING, RESPITE CARE, ELDER CARE, HOSPICE CARE
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23151 Moulton Parkway Ste. 103C
Laguna Hills, CA 92653



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ABOUT ALISO VIEJO

 

 

 

 

About Senior Care

Cultural and geographic differences

The form of elder care provided varies greatly among countries and is changing rapidly. Even within the same country, regional differences exist with respect to the care for the elderly.

Traditionally elder care has been the responsibility of family members and was provided within the extended family home. Increasingly in modern societies, elder care is now being provided by state or charitable institutions. The reasons for this change include decreasing family size, the greater life expectancy of elderly people, the geographical dispersion of families, and the tendency for women to be educated and work outside the home. Although these changes have affected European and North American countries first, it is now increasingly affecting Asian countries also.

In most western countries, elder care facilities are freestanding assisted living facilities, nursing homes, and Continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs).

In the United States, most of the large multi-facility providers are publicly owned and managed as for-profit businesses. There are exceptions; the largest operator in the US is the Evangelical Lutheran Good Samaritan Society, a not-for-profit organization that manages 6,531 beds in 22 states, according to a 1995 study by the American Health Care Association.

In Canada, such privately-run for-profit facilities also exist, but they must compete with government-funded public facilities run by each province's or territory's Ministry of Health. In these care homes, elderly Canadians pay for their care on a sliding scale based on annual income. The scale that they are charged on depends on whether they utilise “Long Term Care” or “Assisted Living”. For example, commencing in January 2010 seniors living in British Columbia’s government subsidized “Long Term Care” (also called “Residential Care”) will pay 80% of their after tax income unless their After Tax Income is less than $16,500. The “Assisted Living” tariff is calculated more simply as 70% of the After Tax Income.

Given the choice, most elders would prefer to continue to live in their own homes (aging in place). Unfortunately the majority of elderly people gradually lose functioning ability and require either additional assistance in the home or a move to an eldercare facility. The adult children of these elders often face a difficult challenge in helping their parents make the right choices. One relatively new service that can help keep the elderly in their homes longer is "respite care". This type of care allows caregivers the opportunity to go on vacation or a business trip and know that their elder has good quality temporary care, for without this help the elder might have to move permanently to an outside facility. Some United States companies, like Senior Helpers, Home Instead Senior Care, Visiting Angels, Caring Senior Service, Accessible Home Health Care, All Valley Home Care, Home Care Assistance, and Comfort Keepers, offer long-term, in-home care for seniors. Elder Options of Texas provides many resources for Texas families searching for elder care resources and information for their elder loved one. Texans 60-plus are projected to total 8.1 million by 2040, a 193 percent increase from 2000. By 2040, the 60-plus population is projected to comprise 23 percent of the total Texas population. According to the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services the 60-plus Texas population will itself grow older. In 2000, the 85-plus population totaled over 237,000; by 2040, this population is projected to reach about 831,000, a 249.4 percent increase. There are many service organizations and agencies that assist families and caregivers on a tight income providing care and assistance their elder loved ones. Organizations such as the Texas Area Agencies on Aging, Texas Meals-on-Wheels-Progams and Sheltering Arms to name just a few are a great place to start. They provide services as well as make referrals.

Medical (skilled care) versus Non-Medical (social care)

A distinction is generally made between medical and non-medical care, and the latter is much less likely to be covered by insurance or public funds. In the US, 86% of the one million or so residents in assisted living facilities pay for care out of their own funds. The rest get help from family and friends and from state agencies. Medicare does not pay unless skilled-nursing care is needed and given in certified skilled nursing facilities or by a skilled nursing agency in the home. Assisted living facilities usually do not meet Medicare's requirements. However, Medicare does pay for some skilled care if the elderly person meets the requirements for the Medicare home health benefit.

Thirty-two U.S. states pay for care in assisted living facilities through their Medicaid waiver programs. Similarly, in the United Kingdom the National Health Service provides medical care for the elderly, as for all, free at the point of use, but social care is only paid for by the state in Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland are yet to introduce any legislation on the matter so currently social care is only funded by public authorities when a person has exhausted their private resources, for example by selling their home.

Elderly care emphasizes the social and personal requirements of senior citizens who need some assistance with daily activities and health care, but who desire to age with dignity. It is an important distinction, in that the design of housing, services, activities, employee training and such should be truly customer-centered.

However, elderly care is focused on satisfying the expectations of two tiers of customers: the resident customer and the purchasing customer, who are often not identical, since relatives or public authorities rather than the resident may be providing the cost of care. Where residents are confused or have communication difficulties, it may be very difficult for relatives or other concerned parties to be sure of the standard of care being given, and the possibility of elder abuse is a continuing source of concern. The Adult Protective Services Agency — a component of the human service agency in most states — is typically responsible for investigating reports of domestic elder abuse and providing families with help and guidance. Other professionals who may be able to help include doctors or nurses, police officers, lawyers, and social workers.

Improving mobility in the elderly

Impaired mobility is a major health concern for older adults, affecting fifty percent of people over 85 and at least a quarter of those over 75. As adults lose the ability to walk, to climb stairs, and to rise from a chair, they become completely disabled. The problem cannot be ignored because people over 65 constitute the fastest growing segment of the U.S. population.

Therapy designed to improve mobility in elderly patients is usually built around diagnosing and treating specific impairments, such as reduced strength or poor balance. It is appropriate to compare older adults seeking to improve their mobility to athletes seeking to improve their split times. People in both groups perform best when they measure their progress and work toward specific goals related to strength, aerobic capacity, and other physical qualities. Someone attempting to improve an older adult’s mobility must decide what impairments to focus on, and in many cases, there is little scientific evidence to justify any of the options. Today, many caregivers choose to focus on leg strength and balance. New research suggests that limb velocity and core strength may also be important factors in mobility.

The family is one of the most important providers for the elderly. In fact, the majority of caregivers for the elderly are often members of their own family, most often a daughter or a granddaughter. Family and friends can provide a home (i.e. have elderly relatives live with them), help with money and meet social needs by visiting, taking them out on trips, etc.

Declaring elderly incompetence

In almost all cases in which elderly persons are declared mentally or physically incompetent to adequately take care of themselves, state laws require that a minimum of two doctors, or other health professionals, vouch for evidence of such incompetence. Only then can legal supervision by a loved one or caretaker be initiated, including power of attorney, guardianship and conservatorship. If doctors' corroboration cannot be obtained by interested parties, then other proof must be proffered to support the case for incompetence, including outstanding bills and financial debt, or substandard living conditions that would be deemed unsafe or hazardous to the elderly person(s).

ABOUT ALISO VIEJO:

City of Aliso Viejo
—  City  —

Seal
Motto: "A solid history, a strong economy, a satisfying way of life. You are most welcome."
Location of Aliso Viejo within Orange County, California.
Country United States
State California
County Orange
Government
 - Mayor Don Garcia
Area
 - Total 10.2 sq mi (26.5 km2)
 - Land 10.2 sq mi (26.5 km2)
 - Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 417 ft (127 m)
Population (2010)
 - Total 46,123
 Density 4,507.8/sq mi (1,740.49/km2)
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 - Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 92656, 92698
Area code(s) 949
FIPS code 06-00947
GNIS feature ID 0252532
Website http://ci.aliso-viejo.ca.us/

Aliso Viejo is a city in Orange County, California. It has a population of 40,166 as of the 2000 census and an estimated population as of 2010 of 46,123. It became Orange County's 34th city on July 1, 2001, the only city in the county to incorporate since 2000. It is bordered by the cities of Laguna Beach on the west and southwest, Laguna Hills on the east, Laguna Niguel on the southeast, and Laguna Woods on the north.

History

Aliso Viejo had been an unincorporated community since around 1990, and incorporated as a city in 2001 due to the efforts of the Aliso Viejo Cityhood 2000 Committee, which was responsible for introducing an initiative on the ballot for the 2001 special election. Voters passed the initiative with 93.3% in favor of incorporation. Carmen Vali-Cave, the co-founder and president of the Committee, became the new city's first mayor.

The original city council consisted of Carmen Vali-Cave, Cynthia Pickett, Bill Phillips, Karl Warkomski, and Greg Ficke. The council selected Vali-Cave to serve as the city's first mayor, and Pickett as the city's first mayor pro tem. Vali-Cave and Pickett served as the mayor and mayor pro tem from 2001 to 2002. In 2003, Pickett became mayor with Phillips as mayor pro tem.

In 2004, City Councilmen Karl Warkomski, Bill Phillips, and Greg Ficke faced re-election. All three candidates were re-elected for four more years on council. Other candidates included Todd Gillespie and Don Garcia. In 2004, Phillips served as the city's mayor with Warkomski as mayor pro tem. In 2005, Warkomski served as mayor with Carmen Vali-Cave as mayor pro tem. In 2006, Vali-Cave served as mayor with Cynthia Pickett-Adams as mayor pro tem. In November 2006, Carmen Vali-Cave and Cynthia Pickett-Adams were re-elected to four-year terms.

In January 2007, Adams again assumed office as the city's mayor with Vali-Cave, again, as the city's mayor pro tem. In February 2007, Councilman Warkomski resigned from office unexpectedly and the council appointed Don Garcia to his position. In March 2007, Phillip Tsunoda was appointed to fill the vacancy left by the departure of Cynthia Adams. Vali-Cave was made mayor and Bill Phillips mayor pro tem after Adams' departure. In 2008, Bill Phillips assumed office as mayor with Don Garcia serving as mayor pro tem. Don Garcia became the mayor in 2009 with Phillip Tsunoda as mayor pro tem.

Government

Aliso Viejo is a general law city with a council-manager system of government. Day-to-day operations are handled by a professional city manager overseen by a volunteer city council.

The City Council of Aliso Viejo consists of five members serving staggered four-year terms. Each year, the Council votes for its next Mayor and Mayor pro tem.

The Seal of the City of Aliso Viejo was adopted in 2001 at incorporation. The seal features several mountains, a boat, a tree, and several buildings. Also, the seal features the slogan "Since 2001", in celebration of the city's incorporation date.

Geography

Aliso Viejo is located at (33.575096, -117.725431) in the San Joaquin Hills of Orange County. According to the Censis Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 26.5 km˛ (10.2 mi˛), all of which is land. Aliso Viejo is one of several cities bordering Aliso and Wood Canyons Regional Park. Aliso Creek forms part of the city's boundary with Laguna Niguel to the south, and Wood Canyon Creek forms part of the city's western boundary. Much of the city rests on the east slope of the San Joaquin Hills, which are a coastal mountain range extending for about 15 miles (24 km) along the Pacific coast.

Climate

Southern California is well-known for year-round pleasant weather:

  • On average, the warmest month is August.

  • The highest recorded temperature was 108°F in 1963.

  • On average, the coolest month is December.

  • The lowest recorded temperature was 21°F in 1949.

  • The maximum average precipitation occurs in February.

The period of April through November is warm to hot and dry with average high temperatures of 74 – 84°F and lows of 52 – 64°F. Due to the moderating effect of the ocean, temperatures are cooler than more inland areas of Los Angeles and Orange County, where temperatures frequently exceed 90°F (32°C) and occasionally reach 100°F (38°C).

The period of November through March is somewhat rainy, as shown in the table to right.

The Los Angeles area is also subject to the phenomena typical of a microclimate. As such, the temperatures can vary as much as 18°F (10°C) between inland areas and the coast, with a temperature gradient of over one degree per mile (1.6 km) from the coast inland. California has also a weather phenomenon called "June Gloom or May Gray", which sometimes brings overcast or foggy skies in the morning on the coast, but usually gives way to sunny skies by noon, during late spring and early summer.

The greater Los Angeles area averages 15 inches (385 mm) of precipitation annually, which mainly occurs during the winter and spring (November thru April) with generally light rain showers, but sometimes as heavy rainfall and thunderstorms. Coastal areas receive slightly less rainfall, while the mountains receive slightly more. Snowfall is extremely rare in the city basin, but the mountains within city limits typically receive snowfall every winter.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 40,166 people, 16,147 households, and 10,689 families residing in what was, at the time, a Census Designated Place (CDP). The population density was 1,516.0/km˛ (3,927.7/mi˛). There were 16,608 housing units at an average density of 626.8/km˛ (1,624.0/mi˛). The racial makeup of the CDP was 78.16% White, 10.99% Asian, 2.06% Black or African American, 0.39% Native American, 0.22% Pacific Islander, 3.51% from other races, and 4.66% from two or more races. 11.65% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 16,147 households out of which 37.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.7% were married couples living together, 10.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.8% were non-families. 23.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 1.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.01.

The population was distributed with 26.1% under the age of 18, 5.5% from 18 to 24, 48.8% from 25 to 44, 16.3% from 45 to 64, and 3.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 93.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.4 males.

According to a 2007 estimate, the median income for a household in the CDP was $92,280, and the median income for a family was $99,853. Males had a median income of $61,316 versus $44,190 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $35,244. About 2.3% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.5% of those under age 18 and 2.8% of those age 65 or over.

As of 2007, the Census Bureau estimates the population of the Aliso Viejo CDP to be 41,424.

Politics

In the state legislature Aliso Viejo is located in the 33rd Senate District, represented by Republican Dick Ackerman, and in the 70th and 73rd Assembly Districts, represented by Republicans Chuck DeVore and Diane Harkey respectively. Federally, Aliso Viejo is located in California's 48th congressional district, which has a Cook PVI of R +8 and is represented by Republican John Campbell.

Economy

Aliso Viejo is known for having the headquarters of many large companies, including:


Points of interest

  • Renaissance ClubSport, is a $65 million property which opened in July 2008. The Renaissance ClubSport is Marriott's second hotel and fitness resort created in conjunction with Leisure Sports, Inc. (ClubSport) to fulfill the growing demand by local residents and hotel guests for a healthier lifestyle.

  • The Aliso Viejo Town Center is the main gathering place for both the young and old residents. It features a movie theater, a wide variety of casual dining restaurants, PetSmart, a Barnes & Noble, Ralphs as well as other shops.

Sports teams

The Orange County Gladiators are an American Basketball Association (ABA) expansion team starting in November 2007. They will play their home games at Aliso Niguel High School.

Emergency services

Fire protection in Aliso Viejo is provided by the Orange County Fire Authority with ambulance service by Doctor's Ambulance. Law enforcement is provided by the Orange County Sheriff's Department.

Education

The city is served by Capistrano Unified School District, which includes these schools:

Elementary

Middle school

High school

Aliso Viejo also has two private secondary schools, St. Mary and All Angels School, Aliso Viejo Christian School, and a university, Soka University of America.

Notable natives and residents

External links

 

CAREGIVER AGENCIES ORANGE COUNTY, HOME CARE, HOSPICE, RESPITE
CAREGIVER, HOME CARE, SENIOR LIVING, RESPITE CARE, ELDER CARE, HOSPICE CARE
Assisted Living, In home Care, Respite Orange County, Hospice Orange County, Elder Care, Senior Care, Home Health Support, Home Hospice, Respite Care Support, Care Giver, Family Home Care Support

"We Care Like Family"
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Services:  In Home Care • Respite Care • Hospice Care • Elder Care • Elder Companionship • Home Hospice • Family Support • Assisted Living

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About Us:
We care like family. We believe that life is a precious gift and we strive to give a "quality of life" which is achieved through quality care. Our mission is to provide the best care ever, "Just like Family". We are dedicated to giving the best care with the kindest and most compassionate services such as In Home Care, Respite Care and Hospice Care throughout all of Orange County. You'll receive great in home care for your loved one by trained, insured, bonded and compassionate caregivers. In an emergency, we can provide care for your loved one within 2 hours.
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  1. home hospice
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SENIOR CARE ALISO VIEJO CA, ALISO VIEJO SENIOR CARE, SENIOR CARE IN ALISO VIEJO, ORANGE COUNTY, CA, HOSPICE ALISO VIEJO, HOMECARE ALISO VIEJO, RESPITE ALISO VIEJO, ASSISTED LIVING ALISO VIEJO, ELDER CARE ALISO VIEJO, NURSING HOME ALISO VIEJO, Aliso Viejo, Orange County, California, 92653, 92656, 92698
SENIOR CARE ALISO VIEJO